I’m trying to study for my Writing course and I need some help to understand this question.

Please respond to the students discussion board. Minimun 250 words for each

1. (Debra) When I write an IEP goal, I collect data and I make sure that the goal is measurable, sustainable and attainable. Making certain he goals are attainable will limit frustration on the part of the student.

I make the attempt to progress monitor bi-weekly, but with huge caseloads, it is typically monthly. At our school we use Aimsweb probes to monitor reading fluency, math computation, math concepts and application and spelling. I often write goals that are not “typical” to Aimsweb such as reading accuracy when either students get very stressed being timed and they can’t show what they know or they’re accuracy is so limited that fluency can not be assessed.

I had a student with ASD this year who came to me with no academic goals. He had speech, OT, task completion and participation goals. We reevaluated him and determined that he needed academic goals for reading, writing and math. Looking at reading as an example, he can decode very well, on grade level as a matter of fact. The problem is with his comprehension. When writing his goal, I had to think about how we could measure his comprehension and make sure he can demonstrate his abilities. After a brainstorming conversation with our LD specialist and speech pathologist I wrote the following goal:

By June 2020, given direct instruction and guided practice, Johnny will orally state the beginning, middle and end of a narrative at his level. Mastery will be determined on 3/4 trials.

The objectives:

By December 2019, given direct instruction and guided practice, Johnny will orally state the beginning, middle and end of a narrative at his level using pictures and print.

By March 2020, given direct instruction and guided practice, Johnny will orally state the beginning, middle and end of a narrative at his level using print.

By June 2020, given direct instruction and guided practice, Johnny will orally state the beginning, middle and end of a narrative at his level verbally.

I decided that my end goal was for him to be able to verbally state beginning, middle, and end, but that I needed to provide scaffolding throughout his instruction to get him there. Progress for this goal will be monitored using checklists to track his progress throughout each trimester.

Progress for all my students is reported to parents with every report card or when we have progress meetings at parents request.

2. (monica) Collecting data is very important for keeping up with student’s progress and I do this by having a folder for each student with their IEP information. I see students daily for one-on-one sessions and will take data when working during this time.

  1. I print the goals and objectives data sheets from ESPED.
  2. I have a condensed version of their goals and objectives for a quick look
  3. I have IEP work in a drawer for each child already prepared and ready to use with the student.
  4. I create checklists based on IEPS (counting to 100, identifying numbers) and will check off when they identify. I also have paper to write down anything that can not be used with a checklist (ex-naming characters, setting)
  5. I will use checklists as an easy way to track how the students are doing when I work with them for the week and will transfer the information to the ESPED data sheets. I know that sounds like extra work, but it is hard to fill out the sheets while working with students. I must be fast moving when working with them and checklists work best.

It is required to report the progress every 9 weeks to the parents. I will keep them updated throughout the year on how their child is making progress on goal and objectives.

3. (Aud) Currently, I do monthly progress monitoring with the students in my class. Many of them have both reading and writing goals, so in those cases I time them with correct words per minute reading assessment and correct word sequence writing assessment. I fill out their progress reports in IEP online and it gets printed out and sent home with the student and where the goals pertain to gen ed, those teachers get a copy, too. I do not have any students with ASD, but I would imagine my approaches would be the same. I can see how the progress monitoring for behavior goals would differ – in this instance I would likely use anecdotal notes to collect the data, put it in a bar graph for comparison and visual progress tracking, and share it with all members (whom the goal relates to) of the IEP team.

Read “Individualized Education Program (IEP) Guide and Other Resources,” on the Autism Speaks website.

http://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/tool-kits/iep-guide



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